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BBCR4 Moral Maze: British values

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You can listen to the show here (for 7 days only)

The 800th anniversary of the sealing of the Magna Carta on the 15th of June next year has taken on a whole new level of importance and symbolism. It’s now become a major plank in the government’s response to the Trojan Horse controversy in some Birmingham schools. Historians may have argued for decades about the true significance of the document, but today politicians are clear – this is now about “British Values” – what they are and the role they should play in education. The only trouble is you have to define them first. And David Cameron wouldn’t be the first politician to come unstuck there. Writing about it this week he started one paragraph with “freedom”, followed quickly by “tolerance” and only 37 words later had resorted to “fish and chips”. So how do we define these values? Perhaps they’re being the kind of socially responsible parent who wants to instil their values into their children and who’s willing to dedicate a considerable amount of their spare time to become a school governor to help their local community? What if those parents happen to be Muslims who want their schools to have more of an “Islamic” ethos in an attempt to insulate their children against the “corrupting” effects of British society? What should you do when the values of a community clash with wider social norms? How tolerant should we be? Is it the role of the state to define and dictate what values should be taught in schools, or should that be the job of parents? Can you even teach values or are they something that we absorb gradually? Is this really about what is, or isn’t being taught in a small group of schools in Birmingham, or is it more a crisis of confidence in our society about what we should and shouldn’t value? Moral Maze – Presented by Michael Buerk.

The panel :

Anne McElvoy

Melanie Phillips

Claire Fox

Giles Fraser

The Witnesses :

Ted Cantle – Former local government leader who carried out an inquiry into the riots in Bradford and other northern cities in 2001. Now advises, writes and lectures on community cohesion.

Myriam Francois-Cerrah – Journalist and broadcaster and a D.Phil candidate in Middle Eastern studies at Oxford University.

Sunder Katwala – Director of British Future, a think tank dedicated to opening up more public debate about identity, integration, migration and opportunity.

Alasdair Palmer – Journalist and former speech-writer for the Home Secretary, Theresa May.

Written by Myriam Francois

June 18, 2014 at 21:53

2 Responses

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  1. Calling it universal is the way to go. It reminds us of our common humanity regardless of our class, race, colour or belief system. Consequently it makes us realise that values such as tolerance is within and capable globally by every human being and not by people from only one particular country/culture & definitely not ONE specific religion.
    Calling it British just creates a culture superiority complex that breeds the worst humane values. That of narcissism, ignorance and conceit. These values also not coincidentally being the key ingredients for war & conflict.

    Why can’t those women on the panel see that? It’s not being allergic it’s being smart and realistic.

    vanhalenpersie

    June 19, 2014 at 12:29

  2. in the world we Muslims are a problem in all the time. more on http://azmalhome.wordpress.com/2013/03/26/islamic-terrorism/

    AZMALHOME

    June 19, 2014 at 14:40


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